Hannes Heinrich

Look Mum No Hands

15.03 – 3.05.2019

 

fullsizeoutput_deaHannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_dd7Hannes Heinrich, o.T., 2019, oil on canvas, approx. 65 x 50 cm

 

fullsizeoutput_dacHannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_dd5Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_ddfHannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_de0Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

DSCF2394_04-XFHannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_de2Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_de5Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_de7Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_de3Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_dd9Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_de4Hannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_ddcHannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_ddeHannes Heinrichs, Look Mum No Hands, 2019, installation view
(All images courtesy of Hannes Heinrich and Jan Erbelding)

 

When one thinks of the description, “a reflective painter” one thinks of a solitary man in studio, quietly considering each brushstroke he makes. Morandi and his objects for instance, slowly gathering dust – Raoul de Keyser would be a more recent example, a “painter’s painter,” pausing when painting the bark of the birch tree to ask, in a very serious voice, “What is a painting?” and hear nothing but silence as his response. 

Hannes Heinrich is a reflective painter in this contemplative sense. He works alone in his studio paintbrush in hand. He has a set of motifs he repeatedly returns to, an inventory of which would read as follows: grids, trees, branches, shadows, shadows of hands, woodgrain. All of these motifs have strong art historical references. The grid reminds us of how the canvas is woven but also of modernist painting. The shadow paintings recall the story of Butades’s daughter, Kora, tracing the silhouette of her lover. Larger than life handprints are like those left in prehistoric caves. Heinrich combines and recombines these elements systematically in a palette of blues (deep ultramarine and pale, like a robin’s egg) reds, yellows and black. Sometimes the grid is painted first, other times, the tree branches in oil crayon. At other times it is difficult to discern the painting process, as despite being painted in layers, the surface seems even, each block of painting lightly resting against the next. There are abstract paintings and more figurative ones and a concern with the boundary between abstraction and illusion. There is no privileging of the original in the classical sense, painting considered to be twice removed from its Platonic form – no stress over painting’s capacity for representation. Heinrich seems happy to be part of the contemporary post digital world, where the kind of illusion offered by figurative painting is one of many and where talk of originals has long ceased. 

But to call Hannes a reflective painter also does him a disservice. It neglects the natural exuberance of his work, its openness, its willingness to engage the viewer. Contemplation implies solitude and while Heinrich’s paintings are certainly thoughtful they are also chatty. The question, “What is painting?” is not asked to silence, set within the four walls of the small studio. It is not even asked to the other paintings that might already be within. It is asked to us. And not in a demanding fashion, expecting us to know, but in a friendly way, with a slight nudge and half smile, “Hey, what IS painting?” Don’t you want to know?

Magdalena Wisniowska 2019

Hannes Heinrich

Look Mum No Hands

15.03. – 03.05.2019

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Vernissage: Freitag 15. März, 18 – 21 Uhr,
15. März 2019 – 3. Mai 2019
Bitte nach Vereinbarung unter contact@gig-munich.com
Finissage: Freitag 3. Mai 2019, 19 – 21 Uhr

 

GiG Munich is excited to open 2019 with the solo exhibition by Hannes Heinrich, Look Mum No Hands.

Hannes Heinrich (b. 1989) is a figurative painter, recently graduated from the Academy of Fine Arts, Munich (Klasse Kneffel). His work has an easy, natural exuberance, a riot of colour and psychedelic-type patterns, Matisse-like brushstrokes and woven grids. His motives are often art historical, as if taken straight out of 19th century academic paintings. There is the myth of Zeuxis and Parrhasius, competing for status of best painter, Butades’ daughter, Kora, tracing her lover’s shadow and wood grain belonging to the carpenters table, two times removed from its Platonic ideal. In his work however, painting’s capacity for illusion lies not at the origin of painting, but is treated as one option out of many available for the painter. Resemblance here no longer belongs to a discourse of the copy and the original but a Road Runner world happy to be full of simulacra, copies were no originals exist.