Maria MVier

Vier

12.10 – 23.11.2019

 

sVrg1-5_DSC0813Vier, 2019, installation view

 

3_DSC0275Vier, 2019, installation view

 

4_DSC0620Vier, 2019, installation view

 

rg1-3_DSC0639Vier, 2019, installation view

 

rg3_DSC0702o. T. [ scarlet red and sap green ], 2019, Indian ink on chromolux, 70 x 100 cm

 

12_DSC0475Vier, 2019, installation view

 

9_DSC0629o. T. [ scarlet red and sap green ], 2019, Indian ink on chromolux, 70 x 100 cm

 

22_DSC0406Vier, 2019, installation view

 

13_DSC0395o.  T. , 2019, Stinging nettles,  black plastic, dimensions variable, detail

 

15_DSC0480o.  T. , 2019, Stinging nettles,  black plastic, dimensions variable, detail

 

20_DSC0482 o.  T. , 2019, Stinging nettles,  black plastic, dimensions variable, detail

 

23_DSC0752o. T. [black ], 2019, Indian ink on newsprint, 42 x 60 cm

 

26_DSC0755o. T. [black ], 2019, Indian ink on newsprint, 42 x 60 cm

 

28_DSC0780o. T. [black ], 2019, Indian ink on newsprint, 42 x 60 cm

 

pd_DSC0816Dear Fear, 2019, reading performance

 

When Adorno was writing his Aesthetic Theory in the 50s and 60s, he could still make the claim, now by all accounts obsolete, that the experience of art is akin to the experience of natural beauty.  “Authentic artworks,” he writes, “hold fast to the idea of a reconciliation with nature by making themselves completely a second nature.” Although already wary of man’s subjugation of nature,  Adorno still believed it was possible to find beauty, if not in nature, then in art that we experience as if it was nature. He would argue we find certain objects in nature beautiful because these present themselves in such a way that allow us to do so.  Artworks are like a second nature because they also allow us to find beauty in them. Genius is nothing more than the creative principle by which this second nature can be produced.

Postmodern and especially feminist critique put this association of natural beauty with the beauty of art into question. While there might be objects that seem to engender claims of beauty, these are by large culturally determined by race, gender or class. Genius is not an innate principle but a historical concept, very much misogynistic in origin, that by definition excludes women from the production of art. So what would it mean to address natural beauty in art now? How can one as an artist approach the problem of nature?

These are some of the questions central to Maria VMier’s practice, and especially to the body of work she presents at GiG Munich, developed during her recent residency at a remote location in Uckermark, near Berlin. On the one hand, the reading she presents to us is a result of her research into the closely connected structures of patriarchy, capitalism and disenchanted nature, taking into account both feminist critique and postcolonial discourse. On site at Uckermack she would walk with her audience to various locations in the surrounding countryside to reflect on her relationship to nature while also referring to our current ecological crisis (the burning of the amazon, climate change denial and climate activism), the political consequences of capitalism’s belief in progress for postcolonial struggles in the global south and ecofeminist attempts to define the common as future sites of resistance. In her writing there is a Thoreau-like longing for a simpler existence within nature as well as the rejection of  hipster or even non-western spirituality, tainted as it is by the colonial representation of the other.

On the other hand her drawings are not so dissimilar to the paintings by Wols that Adorno was writing about more than 60 years ago. Black, scarlet and sap green ink on paper, meandering and interweaving brushstrokes – these formal elements recall the conventions of lyrical abstraction and in their modernism seem to pursue the image of a second nature. But the work also acknowledges that if this image is to be achieved at all it must be done knowingly, the exhibition constructed in such a way to expose the dialectics involved in all our dealings with nature. The meandering arabesques of VMiers large drawings are done on paper more suited to digital printouts than the handmade; the delicate smaller works are pinned like specimens behind plastic covers; the shamanistic frame of drying stinging nettles is set above a shimmering floor of the same plastic sheeting that is used to kill weeds. VMier’s drawings pursue a second nature almost stubbornly, aware of all the historical, political and personal difficulties involved. 

Magdalena Wisniowska 2019

STEFAN LENHART, fruits of the dawn

noname

Eröffnung: Freitag 9. December 2016, 18:00-21:00 Uhr

Austellungdauer: 9 December 2016 – 13 Januar 2017

Finissage: Freitag 13. Januar 2017, 8:00-21:00 Uhr

GiG Munich is happy to present “fruits of the dawn,” the latest installation by Munich based artist and curator, Stefan Lenhart .

Stefan Lenhart, born 1969, graduated from the Academy of Fine Art, Munich in 2007. Since then, he has exhibited widely in Germany and abroad, most recently “Anthophobia” at the Artothek, Munich, 2016. The extensive catalogue “M.A.D.” of his work was published by Distanz in  2012. He is also founder of the project space, “Tanzschule projects” which ran from 2007-2012.

His work consists of large-scale installations that use references to the historical avant-garde – modernism and surrealism – to produce new meaning. Taking a holistic approach, he combines painting, sculpture and other modes of presentation in ways that are simultaneously theatrical and conceptual, unexpected and strange.

At GiG Munich, Stefan Lenhart presents a new series of light pieces. Constructed out of  used painter’s palettes, cut and arranged in the same asymmetric spiral shape, this new work plays with ideas of order, chance, destruction and creation.

USA participating artists: Vanessa Jackson

Vanessa Jackson

Amerika

The place we never quite get to, only in our imagination from books and films. I have been to NYC more times than I can remember, had a studio and exhibited, lived there for months at a time, fell in love, back in the 80’s, been south as far as Washington DC and up to Boston, even spent a couple of weeks in LA and SanFrancisco. But America I do not know…..and perhaps I am more familiar with Amerika on my mind.

This work was made back then, very curvy, playing with the neo geo of the times, more curves than was allowed in strictly modernism revisited.

Vanessa Jackson lives and works in London and went to St Martins Art School and the Royal College of Art. She has shown extensively as a painter with recent exhibitions in London of wall paintings at Sadler’s Wells Theatre and the Café Gallery, Southwark Park.

www.vanessajackson.co.uk                                                                                               VJ 2013