elements

Lukas Hoffmann, Andrea Zabric

16.12.2018 – 11.01.2019

 

fullsizeoutput_820elements, 2018, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_82delements, 2018, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_823Andrea Zabric, Pigment sculptures (Berlin red and Naples Yellow)  2018, pigment, dimensions variable

 

fullsizeoutput_835Andrea Zabric, Pigment sculptures (Berlin red and Naples Yellow)  2018, pigment, dimensions variable

 

fullsizeoutput_824Andrea Zabric, Pigment sculpture (Berlin red)  2018, pigment, dimensions variable

 

fullsizeoutput_825Andrea Zabric, Pigment sculptures (Naples yellow, 43870,)  2018, pigment, 12 x 10 x 10 cm

 

fullsizeoutput_827elements, 2018, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_828Lukas Hoffmann, o. T., 2018, Series of 4, each in edition of 10, Stainless steel, dimensions variable

 

fullsizeoutput_830Lukas Hoffmann, o. T. and o. T, 2018, stainless steel, various textiles, pvc, plastic fittings, steel, aluminium bronze, German silver, 150 x 3 x 3 cm and 50 x 15 x 3 cm

 

fullsizeoutput_82aLukas Hoffman, o. T., 2018, various textiles, pvc, plastic fittings, steel, aluminium bronze, german silver, 150 x 3 x 3 cm

 

fullsizeoutput_832Lukas Hoffmann in elements, 2018, installation view

 

fullsizeoutput_82cLukas Hoffmann, o. T., 2018, bronze, 15 x 4 x 4 cm each

 

fullsizeoutput_82eLukas Hoffmann, o. T., 2018, series of 5, stainless steel, 9 x 1 cm each

 

fullsizeoutput_82fLukas Hoffmann, o. T. and o. T., 2018, stainless steel and various textiles, pvc, 9 x 1 cm each and 65 x 35 x 8 cm

 

fullsizeoutput_833Lukas Hoffmann, o. T., 2018, various textiles, pvc, 65 x 35 x 8 cm

 

The show elements, featuring new work by Lukas Hoffmann and Andrea Zabric, is GiG Munich’s first collaboration with Klasse Pia Fries, Akademie der bildene Kunst, München. Klasse Pia Fries is well known for its focus on abstract painting, especially in its material aspect. Both Andrea Zabric, a recent graduate (2018), and Lukas Hoffmann, a student at the class, incorporate material elements in their practice, but in a strongly conceptual rather than a painterly fashion.

Carbon, aluminium, iron, copper – basic chemical elements are at play in the work, often in their purest form. These instead of being manipulated by the artist’s hand are left in their natural alien state. Matter is subject to its own internal logic not the artist’s touch, and the method of production incorporates industrial, mechanical, and printing processes. While this is obviously human in origin, technology as much a product of man as any painting, when combined with the emphasis on materiality, lends their investigations a scientific rather than artistic quality. As an attempt to think the world outside of the personal relationship we have with it, the work relates to speculative realist concerns currently present in art and philosophy. It shares with speculative realism a taste for the dogmatic, the formal and the mathematical.  

Zabric’s signature pigment sculptures, quite literally, take centre stage. Painting becomes reduced to its primary components: space, ground and pigment. The pigment is not mixed with medium and spread across the ground in its customary way, but is compressed at high pressure to form unusually perfect cuboid shapes. This gives her colours an uncanny density, a new found depth that recalls the violence of its making. For GiG Munich Zabric has produced three new pieces in pigments she had not used before. The work is also more experimental than previously, in that she allows the pieces to crumble, thus exposing their innate vulnerability. 

For all its implications of aggression, Hoffmann’s work is curiously invisible, scattered around the room, sometimes disguised as items of furniture.  Instead of paintings, we encounter clothes hooks, a javelin is placed against the wall ready for use. Bullets (or are they exercise bars? maybe dildos?) lie waiting on the floor. The casual method of display serves to highlight the works tactile qualities, drawing us in. In a moment of masochism, we want to touch the sharp points with our fingertip and wait for the skin to break. Yet simultaneously we feel that to do so would be an imposition, we would enter a space that its not for us, that belongs to someone else, or indeed to the work itself. Quietly, the work turns away from us and withdraws into its own realm. 

Magdalena Wisniowska 2018

elements

Lukas Hoffmann, Andrea Zabric

26.11.2018 – 18.01.2019

 

fullsizeoutput_76e

 

Vernissage: Freitag 16. November, 18 – 21 Uhr,
16 November 2018 – 18 Januar 2019
Bitte nach Vereinbarung unter contact@gig-munich.com
Finissage: Freitag 18. Januar 2019, 19 – 21 Uhr

 

The exhibition elements, showcasing new work by Lukas Hoffmann and Andrea Zabric is GiG Munich’s first collaboration with Klasse Pia Fries, Akademie der Bildenden Künste München.

What connects the two young, upcoming artists is a shared interest in materialism, where their version of materialism belongs more to the philosophical developments centred around Speculative Realism than to the handmade, expressive variety traditionally associated with the activity of painting. Operating at the intersection of materialism and realism, they submit to the view that the primacy afforded to matter necessarily demotes the importance of the human understanding of it. If matter is all there is, then its reality must be encountered for itself. In their quasi-scientific, quasi-magical approaches, they reject the emphasis on the multiplicity of interpretations that art borrowed from dominant modes of contemporary critical theory (post-structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis) in order to pursue an almost essential, almost dogmatic, grounding of reality. With this comes a violence, whether this is manifested in the high pressure Zabric submits her pigments to, or the highly polished weapon-like quality of Hoffmann’s metal work. They show that the material world, the inhuman one, is intense, forceful, elemental.

 

Magdalena Wisniowska 2018

 

USA participating artists: Jack Lovell

Jack Lovell

A young Vietnamese man poses with a US soldier. The American is holding the remains of an amputated arm, removed to prevent the Vietnamese man  from dying of an infected gunshot wound. In a gesture of gratitude to the American, the cleaned bone was offered as a keepsake. Unlike many who received similar war gifts,  the US soldier eventually returned to Vietnam. This year the missing arm was finally reunited with its owner.

Jack Lovell currently lives and works in London. His practice explores the hidden complexity and materiality of the found photograph. The use of enigmatic staged photography invites the viewer to consider the space that exists inside a ‘simulated reality’.                                                                                              JL 2013