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We breathe the remains of everything that was

Zuza Piekoszewska, Natalia Karczewska, Magda Starska, Grzegorz Bożek, Paweł Marcinek und Przemysław Piniak

(curated by Łęctwo)

31.07 – 19.08.2022

Lothringer 13 Studio, Lothringer Straße 13, 81667 Munich

Opening: Sunday 31st July, 3 – 8 pm

Guest Speaker: Dr. Sebastian Truskolaski, 6 pm

 

Zuza Piekoszewska, Future Traveller, 2020, metal, bioplastic and acrylic

‘We breathe the remains of everything that was’ is the first of the exhibition series ‘Re-collection’ organised by GiG Munich at Lothringer 13 Studio from July to December 2022. 

GiG Munich is currently operating nomadically as GiG air, presenting work at different locations both physical and virtual. For 2022, Lothringer 13 Halle  invited GiG Munich to produce the ‘Re-collection’ exhibition series at the Lothringer 13 Studio, a continuation of the previous series ‘Thinking Nature’ that took place at GiG Munich in 2021, For this first exhibition at a new location, GiG Munich collaborates with the hybrid space Łęctwo run by Przemek Sowiński, to present the work of Zuza Piekoszewska, Natalia Karczewska, Magda Starska, Grzegorz Bożek, Paweł Marcinek and Przemysław Piniak.

If GiG Munich’s focus has always been the more abstract and theoretical, Łęctwo’s interests tend to lie in the immediate and physical, as well as the intimate. Łęctwo’s programme of contemporary art always has had this utopian element, art as a deeply personal drive to transform the surrounding reality, enacting real change in our cognitive lives. In their exhibition together, GiG Munich and Łęctwo look together at the idea of cultural memory, in relation to nature, biology and human.

 

“Wir atmen die Überreste von allem, was war” ist der erste Teil der Ausstellungsreihe “Re-collection”, die von GiG Munich im Lothringer 13 Studio von Juli bis Dezember 2022 organisiert wird. 

 GiG Munich ist derzeit als GiG air nomadisch aktiv und präsentiert Arbeiten an verschiedenen Orten, sowohl physisch als auch virtuell. Für 2022 hat die Lothringer 13 Halle GiG Munich  eingeladen, die Ausstellungsreihe “Re-collection” im Lothringer 13 Studio zu produzieren in Fortsetzung der Reihe “Thinking Nature”, die 2021 bei GiG Munich stattfand. Für diese erste Ausstellung an einem neuen Ort kooperiert GiG Munich mit Łęctwo von Przemek Sowiński und zeigt Arbeiten von Zuza Piekoszewska, Natalia Karczewska, Magda Starska, Grzegorz Bożek, Paweł Marcinek und Przemysław Piniak.

Während sich GiG Munich seit jeher auf das Abstrakte und Theoretische konzentriert, liegt das Interesse von Łęctwo eher im Unmittelbaren und Körperlichen sowie im Intimen. Das Programm von Łęctwo für zeitgenössische Kunst hatte schon immer diesen utopischen Aspekt, da es die Kunst als einen zutiefst persönlichen Antrieb zur Veränderung der uns umgebenden Realität ansieht, der einen echten Wandel in unserem kognitiven Leben bewirkt. In ihrer gemeinsamen Ausstellung befassen sich GiG Munich und Łęctwo mit der Idee des kulturellen Gedächtnisses in Bezug auf die Natur, die Biologie und die menschliche Existenz.


Na każdych kroku trafiamy na rozciągnięte w czasie pozostałości naszej własnej egzystencji. Szczątki i pyły poprzedniego istnienia przenikają nasze płuca, przywołując pamięć tego co robili nasi przodkowie. Pozostawione przez nas rzeczy stają się surowcami nowych procesów, a śmierć  jest tylko epizodem nigdy niekończocęgo się cyklu. W tym wszystkim najbardziej realna wydaje się teraźniejszość, ale czmyże jest skoro ciągle się od nas odsuwa. Każdy nasz oddech wypełnia atmosferę, stając się przeszłością w chwili zaczerpnięcia nowego. Każdy nasz wydech zawiera ułamek przewidywanej przyszłości. Te dwa czasy pozostają w ścisłej relacji. Być może odzyskujemy to, co już dawno zniknęło nam z zasięgu wzroku. Ciągłość rzeczy, w której każda materia, przeszłość i przyszłość przenikają do nas horyzontalnie, nie tylko na poziomie odczuwania metafizycznego, ale realnej zmiany genów, dając nadzieję na zupełnie inną, hybrydyczną formę istnienia.

Przemek Sowiński

At every step, we encounter the remnants our own existence spread out in time. The debris and dust of our previous lives penetrate our lungs, evoking the memory of what our ancestors did. The things left behind by us become the raw materials of new processes, and death is only an episode of a never ending cycle. In all of this, the present seems to be the most real, but what is this present, when it always moves away from us? Each of our breaths fills the atmosphere, becoming the past with every new gulp of air we inhale. Each exhaled breath contains a fraction of the foreseeable future.  These two times remains in close relation.  Perhaps we are recovering what has long since disappeared from our sight. The continuity of things, in which all matter, past and future permeate us horizontally, not only at the level of metaphysical feeling, but of real genetic transformation, giving hope for a completely different, hybrid form of being.

trans. Magdalena Wisniowska

Auf Schritt und Tritt stoßen wir auf die zeitlich gestreckten Überreste unserer eigenen Existenz. Der Schutt und Staub unseres früheren Lebens dringt in unsere Lungen ein und ruft die Erinnerung an das hervor, was unsere Vorfahren getan haben. Die Dinge, die wir zurückgelassen haben, werden zu Rohstoffen für neue Prozesse, und der Tod ist nur eine Episode in einem nie endenden Kreislauf. In all dem scheint die Gegenwart am realsten zu sein, aber wie kann die das sein, wenn sie sich ständig von uns entfernt. Jeder Atemzug, den wir nehmen, füllt die Atmosphäre und wird in dem Moment, in dem wir einen neuen Atemzug nehmen, zur Vergangenheit. Jedes Ausatmen enthält einen Bruchteil der vorhersehbaren Zukunft. Diese beiden Zeiten stehen in engem Zusammenhang. Vielleicht holen wir zurück, was schon lange aus unserem Blickfeld verschwunden ist. Die Kontinuität der Dinge, in der alle Materie, Vergangenheit und Zukunft uns horizontal durchdringen, nicht nur auf der Ebene des metaphysischen Gefühls, sondern der realen genetischen Transformation, die Hoffnung auf eine völlig andere, hybride Form des Daseins gibt.

LOST AND FOUND

Julia Klemm, Justin Lieberman, Lilian Robl, Pat Shoulder, Johanna Strobel

30.07 – 2.09.2021

Lost and Found, 2021, installation view

Lost and Found, 2021, installation view

Lost and Found, 2021, installation view

Lost and Found, 2021, installation view

Lost and Found, 2021, installation view

Johanna Strobel, False Friends, 2021, acrylic mirrors, plastic, glass, aluminium, clockworks 

(clockwise and counterclockwise), LEDs, USB extension cords, digital timer, size variable (each approx. 25

x 25 x 5 cm)

Julia Klemm, untitled, 2020, ceramic, glaze, second-hand ceramic leopards, 76 x 30 x 33 cm

Julia Klemm, untitled, 2020, ceramic, glaze, second-hand ceramic leopards, 76 x 30 x 33 cm

Lost and Found, 2021, installation view,

Julia Klemm, untitled, 2021, ceramic, glaze, second-hand ceramic leopard, 32 x 28 x 33 cm

Julia Klemm, untitled, 2021, ceramic, glaze, second-hand ceramic leopard, 32 x 28 x 33 cm

Julia Klemm, untitled, 2021, ceramic, glaze, second-hand ceramic leopard, 32 x 28 x 33 cm

Pat Shoulder, Sun Umbrella, 2020, Steel, paint, print on textile

Lost and Found, 2021, installation view

Justin Lieberman, Obscure Readability, 2020, ceramic, glass and pedestal with sand, 41 x 22 x 12 cm (Courtesy of Galerie Christine Mayer)

Justin Lieberman, Obscure Readability, 2020, ceramic, glass and pedestal with sand, 41 x 22 x 12 cm (Courtesy of Galerie Christine Mayer)

Lilian Robl,Winning Hearts and Minds, 2016, 5 min 55 sec (plus textile bag and assorted metal objects)

A naturalist, specifically an 18th century one, likes to classify. After an expedition to the jungles of some remote land he – and it is almost always a he – takes out his specimens and begins to compare. This one looks like the second, the third does not, the fourth has some features of the first two, but also some traits seen in the third. He makes up categories and puts labels on boxes, marking the time and place at which the specimens were found. He then takes out a scalpel and cuts them open in order to examine their inner structure. Here are the muscles and these are the breathing organs. This is the skin, and under the microscope he can see the epidermal structure. Visually speaking, the naturalist proceeds mimetically, by finding patterns and organising resemblances. He looks and compares. He judges accordingly. 

There are however animals that escape the naturalist’s grasp. Fictional beings like vampires and werewolves, who live in darkness of our imaginations and spread by infecting others with their poisonous bite – these can be easily dismissed as unworthy of our serious attention. Viruses and pandemics less so. A virus can hardly be deemed alive, reproducing only in the host’s body. Although it mutates, it does not develop to evolve into ever more complex organisms. While it can be placed into groups of similar viruses, it eludes the classificatory system with its orders, families, genera and species.

The exhibition ‘Lost and Found’ has a slightly dystopian, even post-apocalyptic quality, of various objects assembled in haste and then disregarded, leftovers from a Mad-Max film set. A preview exhibition, it consists of artists who will hopefully be part of GiG Munich’s ‘Thinking Nature’ 2022 programme, which examines the relationship between man and nature, as it presents itself in thought. These artists were selected because their practices are not of class and order, but rather of mutation and infection. We see this most in Julia Klemm’s sculpture were kitsch ceramic animals are broken up and then reassembled, set precariously on their rickety plinths. Pat Shoulder’s work is collaborative, a result of an exchange of letters between the two artists during the first lockdown. The order of time is put into question with Johanna Strobel’s installations and  logic disintegrates in Lilian Robl’s videos.  There is a celebration of nature’s structures in the glass turtle shells of Justin Lieberman but again this order is not that of the naturalist. As with the others, it is a viral order of an unnatural kind. 

LOST AND FOUND

30.07 – 2.03.2021

Soft Opening: 29.07.21, 6 – 9 pm

As the previously planned exhibition had to unfortunately be cancelled, GiG Munich would like to use this opportunity to introduce a few artists, who it will be collaborating with next year as part of the ongoing ‘Thinking Nature’ series. Lost and Found is a preview exhibition, ‘lost’ because of the work that got lost in the post, ‘found’, because of the new work about to be discovered. The exhibition is a spontaneous one – what will happen, will happen. 

Save the date: On Repeat!

21st September – 26th October

Alasdair Duncan, Jenny Dunseath, Jonah Gebka, Jane Harris, Melina Hennicker, Steffen Kern, Claudio Matthias Bertolini, Michael Schmidt, Amanda Ure, Magdalena Wisniowska

FINAL_hard_hard_hat_hat_PINK

Repetition. Not opposed to originality. Not the repetition of the same. But a call to productivity. To discovery and experimentation. To repeat is to start again, over and over. It is to affirm the unexpected and the new.